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kiss me before you go

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The dead weep with joy when their books are reprinted. 
—Russian Ark
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Reading and rereading these stories, one has to wonder (and especially one already peering into the rearview mirror) why it is that Kuttner and Moore are so nearly forgotten.

Aside, naturally, from the fact that their books are not sitting in glossy uniform paperback editions on shelves at WalMart and Barnes & Noble.

And aside from the general truth that, in the arts, innovators pass the torch on to popularizers. Few of us listen to Lonnie Johnson these days. Many listen to Stevie Ray Vaughan—even wear the hat.

Certainly the work is dated. The earliest of these stories is from 1940, the most recent from 1956 and 1958; the bulk are from the early to mid-forties. Narrative conventions have changed, social norms have shifted and shifted again, and many of the elements that initially gave the work such impact, that made it so startlingly original—sharply depicted characterizations, the attention to detail in the writing, the moodiness of settings, its moral gravity, even the ideas—have long since passed into the mainstream of science fiction, and therefrom to film and TV.

Time is a careless shepherd. Kuttner’s and Moore’s work is very much of a specific instant, suspended back there during science fiction’s golden age and the last hurrah of the pulps with dozens of magazines needing material. It was a passage even then narrowing as newfangled paperback novels supplanted the role of magazine fiction. And though they wrote novels, Kuttner and Moore were primarily short-story writers. They were, too, extremely versatile, ever hopping from horse to horse, hard to get a hold on. Their contributions, the directions in which they urged the field, the facility and ambitions they fostered, are massive. And they are forgotten.

 
—James Sallis, “Detour to Otherness” (review)
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liartownusa:

Yearbook No. 3 (Satanic)
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liartownusa:

Yearbook No. 3 (Satanic)

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oazj:

James Dawson, arrested for Indecent Exposure. North Shields Police Station, 9th June 1902.
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oazj:

James Dawson, arrested for Indecent Exposure. North Shields Police Station, 9th June 1902.

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allotherthingsintheworld:

Mary Lizzie Macomber, Night and her Daughter Sleep (La Notte e sua figlia il Sonno), 1902
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allotherthingsintheworld:

Mary Lizzie Macomber, Night and her Daughter Sleep (La Notte e sua figlia il Sonno), 1902

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Girl on swing 1902

(Source: windy-soul, via windy-soul)

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jolyswittygirl:

A Trip to the Moon (1902)

Voyage Dans La Lune (original title)

Director:

 Georges Méliès (uncredited)
A group of astronomers travel to the Moon in a cannon-propelled spaceship. 
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Georges Méliès (/mɛ.li.ˈəz/French: [meljɛs]; 8 December 1861 – 21 January 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was aFrench illusionist and filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest days of cinema. Méliès, a prolific innovator in the use of special effects, accidentally discovered the substitution stop trick in 1896, and was one of the first filmmakers to use multiple exposurestime-lapse photographydissolves, and hand-painted color in his work. Because of his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality through cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the first “Cinemagician”. Two of his best-known films are A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Impossible Voyage (1904). Both stories involve strange, surreal voyages, somewhat in the style of Jules Verne, and are considered among the most important early science fiction films, though their approach is closer to fantasy. Méliès was also an early pioneer of horror cinema, which can be traced back to his Le Manoir du diable (1896).
After being driven out of business, Méliès disappeared from public life. By the mid-1920s he was making a meager living as a candy and toy salesman at the Montparnasse station in Paris. This was the subject of the film Hugo (2011).

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8QPehtzs_c

http://www.openculture.com/2013/08/a-trip-to-the-moon-and-five-other-free-films-by-georges-melies-the-father-of-special-effects.html

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hoodoothatvoodoo:

Hamilton King
'The Black Bonnet'
1902
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hoodoothatvoodoo:

Hamilton King

'The Black Bonnet'

1902

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backtothehills:

1902 Girls dressed as gnomes
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backtothehills:

1902 Girls dressed as gnomes

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art-and-fury:

Dream Idyll - Edward Robert Hughes
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art-and-fury:

Dream Idyll - Edward Robert Hughes

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